Professor

Department of Physics

University of Maryland

Office: Room 4328 Physics Building

Phone: 301-405-6033

Fax: 301- 699-9195

Email: goodman@umdgrb.umd.edu



Research

  1. -HAWC

  2. -IceCube

  3. -Milagro


Awards:

UM President’s Medal

Fellow AAAS

ACC Teaching Scholar

Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award Lecture - CTE

CMPS Distinguish Alumni Award

Kirwan Prize for Undergraduate Education

Fellow UM Academy of Excellence in Teaching and Learning

Richtmyer Lecture Prize– American Physical Society

USM Regents Award for Excellence in Teaching

UMCP Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Award

Fellow of the American Physical Society

UM Presidential Award for Outstanding Service to the Schools


 
 

Jordan Goodman is a professor and the former Chair of Physics Department at the University of Maryland. His area of research, Particle Astrophysics, studies cosmic radiation to better understand the properties of elementary particles and the processes in space that produce these particles. This field blends elements of high energy physics and astrophysics.

Starting with his Ph.D. work, which showed evidence for an abundance of heavy elements such as iron in high energy cosmic rays, he has worked to understand the nature of cosmic rays which hit the earth. Recently, his work has concentrated on two experimental efforts-- Milagro and IceCube.

He is now the Principal Investigator of the HAWC Experiment


A CV can be found here.
 

Recent Publications

Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube, Phys. Rev. D 83, 012001 (2011)


Constraints on high-energy neutrino emission from SN 2008D. (R. Abbasi et al.) Astron.Astrophys.527:A28, 2011. [arXiv:1101.3942]


Search for neutrino-induced cascades with five years of AMANDA data. (R. Abbasi, et al.) Astropart.Phys.34:420-430, 2011.


Search for a Lorentz-violating sidereal signal with atmospheric neutrinos in IceCube. (R. Abbasi et al.) Phys.Rev.D82:112003, 2010. [arXiv:1010.4096]


Search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the AMANDA-II neutrino telescope. By R. Abbasi, et al., Eur.Phys.J.C69:361-378, 2010.


The first search for extremely-high energy cosmogenic neutrinos with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. (R. Abbasi et al.) Phys.Rev.D82:072003, 2010. [arXiv:1009.1442]


Measurement of the Anisotropy of Cosmic Ray Arrival Directions with IceCube. (R. Abbasi et al.) Astrophys.J.718:L194, 2010. [arXiv:1005.2960]


The Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II Detector.  (R. Abbasi et al.) Astropart.Phys.34:48-58, 2010. [arXiv:1004.2357]


Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector.  (R. Abbasi et al.) Phys.Rev.D81:057101, 2010. [arXiv:0910.4480]


Milagro Observations of TeV Emission from Galactic Sources in the Fermi Bright Source List (A. Abdo et. al.) Ap. J. Letters Apr 2009 700:L127-L131,(2009)


Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector. (R. Abbasi et al.) Phys.Rev.Lett.102:201302,(2009)


Determination of the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux and Searches for New Physics with AMANDA-II. (R. Abbasi et al.) Phys.Rev.D79:102005,(2009)


Search for Point Sources of High Energy Neutrinos with Final Data from AMANDA-II. (R. Abbasi et al.). Phys.Rev.D79:062001,(2009)


The Large Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as Observed with Milagro. (A.A. Abdo et al.) Astrophys.J.698:2121-2130,(2009)


 

Professor of Physics